Wednesday, February 3, 2010

You're in America, learn English!

We're doing a birthday party for Shlomik at his day care and I asked the owner, Russian Israeli, what to bring.  She said not to bring "choken hazart", written with Russian letters.  I told her I have no idea what she means by that.  Is it a brand?  Company name?  Hashgocha?
Apparently "choken hazart" means choking hazard.

16 comments:

  1. I thought you spoke fluent Russian? ..unless that's not Russian...

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  2. I do speak fluent Russian but instead of translating "choking hazard" into Russian she decided to transliterate it using Russian letters instead. Except chocking hazard somehow ended up being choken hazart...

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  3. LOL!!!! I can just see it happening..

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  4. Dude, I honestly thought she was talking about a hashgocha or something. She's here long enough. This is not grammar, this is basic spelling and "chocking hazard" is a very common warning. There's no excuse.

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  5. Did you know you misspelled "choking" twice in the comments - or was that meant ironically?

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  6. And you're the only person who noticed...

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  7. i actually went to look at that day care 2 weeks ago

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  8. Not so funny when you're trying to figure out what chicken hazer is...

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  9. LOZ, which one did you decide on?

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